The Week in Review: September 9

AUTUMN IS COMING

With the kids back in school and Labour Day weekend in the rearview mirror, Vancouver turned its head to the future this week. For LMPR and a massive portion of the city's population, this asking what the arts had in store for the months ahead.

To answer this question, Fall Arts Previews were put out on news stands by the Georgia Straight, Westender, and The Province (with the Vancouver Sun's coming out tomorrow). It's a thrill to see all the incredible work that our friends, clients, and community will be soon be bringing to our stages.

Vancouver Opera's Sheila Christie & guitar virtuoso Adrian Verdejo

Vancouver Opera's Sheila Christie & guitar virtuoso Adrian Verdejo

ARCADE FIRE CONTROLS YOUR WEBCAM

Legendary Canadian band Arcade Fire followed through on weeks of rumours on Monday by releasing the first track from an upcoming album – Reflektor. Never ones to adhere to convention, the music video is a work of interactive art unto itself, which utilizes a computer webcam and a smartphone or tablet to create a disorienting and fascinating experience.

J.K. ROWLING RETURNS TO WIZARDRY

In a move analogous to Marvel's upcoming Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. TV series, J.K. Rowling announced she would be writing a film set in the Harry Potter universe, but not featuring any of the original series protagonists. The screenplay will be based upon a textbook referenced in the novels - Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them- and will follow its fictitious author, Newt Scamander.

SERGEI FILIN RETURNS TO MOSCOW

Eight months and 22 surgeries following a shocking acid attack, the Artistic Director of Russia's Bolshoi Ballet is return to Moscow. The world's dance community were rocked by news of the attack last January, which also heralded a period of intense scrutiny and debate around the company's operations.

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Sergei Filin at a press conference earlier today. (Martin Meissner/Associated Press)

BOOKER SHORTLIST ANNOUNCED

The Man Booker Prize shortlist was unveiled this week, with authors Jim Crace and Colm Toibin identified as favourites to win the prestigious award. Given out annually, its single, simple criteria is that the winning book be 'the best novel in the opinion of the judges.'

Now in its 45th year, the prize has only been won by three Canadians: three Canadian winners in the prize’s forty-two year history: Yann Martel for Life of Pi in 2002), Margaret Atwood for The Blind Assassin in 2000, and Michael Ondaatje for The English Patient, which was co-winner in 1992.

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